Green Edge NYC * Community for a Sustainable Future

I am starting to stress about it.

Views: 20

Replies to This Discussion

Rut Row,
don't get me started. First of all, since I don't celebrate christmas, they mean nothing to me symbolically, other than destruction of nature. The fact that people ultimately chuck them when they'e "done" w/ them is naueseating. and like hello, who supports cutting down trees??! personally, I think everyone who wants a christmas tree or wreath should make their own "virtual one" on line, and leave mother earth alone...

cheers and happy happy......
How about planting 2 (or more) to replace it, and mulching it when you're done?

You could also get really creative and make your own tree from recyclable paper or old clothes and stuffed animals and take it apart after the holiday and recycle or donate whatever pieces you can. Or you might want to keep it forever. Harpo Marx once kept a Christmas tree, decorated, for an entire year.

But I think if you really love to have a real tree (the smell is the best part anyway), you can take my initial advice, or you can get a live tree and plant it when you're done. If it's a small tree and you have a fire escape/balcony/backyard, you could probably keep it unadorned until next year, and, depending on the greeness of your thumb, not have to worry about this again for quite some time.

I don't believe Christmas trees have to be an all-or-nothing proposition.
Dina-Somehow I've gotten around this issue for the past couple of years. But my daughter, who is 11, really wants me to have a tree. Her mother always has a huge one, so that would be two trees down. But I am trying to rein in my Grinchian tendencies. Okay, so right off the bat I was planning on mulching. And I would get a farmed tree, so they're sustainable. Planting trees is a good idea. It would do a lot to assuage whatever vague guilt feelings I have about this issue. I know there are groups that do this (plant trees) but I'd need to do some research. Good ideas, P
Sounds like you need to plant 4 trees at least, don't you think? Maybe the farm you get yours from will have some ideas.

And who knows, maybe in a few years you and your daughter will be making some kind of handmade tree. Or create your own replacement ritual. Have you ever taken her to see the origami ornaments at the Museum of Natural History? They are very cool, even though they're on a real tree. You could make an origami tree, it's not that hard.

Environmentalism will never flourish in our society if it's based on making people feel guilty and deprived. I think the chances that she'll see things more your way someday are very, very good if you don't try to force her too soon.

Peter said:
Dina-Somehow I've gotten around this issue for the past couple of years. But my daughter, who is 11, really wants me to have a tree. Her mother always has a huge one, so that would be two trees down. But I am trying to rein in my Grinchian tendencies. Okay, so right off the bat I was planning on mulching. And I would get a farmed tree, so they're sustainable. Planting trees is a good idea. It would do a lot to assuage whatever vague guilt feelings I have about this issue. I know there are groups that do this (plant trees) but I'd need to do some research. Good ideas, P
Erica-I appreciate your strong convictions. Being a Buddhist without beliefs, I celebrate Christmas as a pagan, reasonably nonconsumist holiday. For pagans, Christmas trees were importantly symbolic, like holly--evergreen. I'm thinking even the druids and the people hanging at Stonehenge cut them down for the solstice. So, I think the pagans probably saw evergreen trees (even cut down and decorated in their homes) as a celebration of nature, not as destruction. (But that was before global warming was an issue.) But what about mulching the tree afterwards to fertilize, say, Prospect Park, and planting two trees or gifting two trees to an organization that would plant them? Excuse my presumption, but it sounds like maybe you don't have an 11-year-old at you. I'm trying to find a middle way. Jollily, Peter
Thanks, Dina. You're a font of ideas. I'm beginning to come around to the recycled tree concept. It could be a fun project. Let's see, I could also set up some small solar panels outside my window to power a few LEDs. Peace.
Christmas trees are grown on Christmas Tree farms - new trees are planted at the farms all the time, just like new crops at vegetable farms - it is not like the trees are being cut down from the woods. In addition - the trees are recycled and used for mulch not just simply discarded. Here is info on the recycling program of DSNY:

The NYC Department of Sanitation will be conducting special collections for mulching and recycling of Christmas trees.

Trees can be put out starting on the evening of Sunday, January 4, 2009. Collections will take place beginning on Monday, January 5 through Saturday, January 17. Beginning on Saturday, January 17, Christmas trees will be collected with regular garbage.

Residents are encouraged to put out thier trees as early as possible during the collection period.

DSNY asks residents to remove all tree stands, tinsel, lights, and ornaments from trees before placing them out for collection. DO NOT place trees in plastic bags. Trees will be chipped into compost, which will be distributed to parks, playing fields, and community gardens throughout the city.

New Yorkers can also participate in NYC Parks & Recreation Mulchfest by bringing their holiday trees to designated sites across the five boroughs to be chipped into mulch by the Parks Department. The mulch is used to nourish plantings across the City. Before dropping off your tree, remove all lights and ornaments. Free mulch will be available at Mulchfest locations—bring a bag if you would like to leave with a bag of mulch.


So many far more wasteful things than this.

RSS

GET UPDATES





Lists
Newsletter
Volunteer Opportunities
Events

Events

GREEN EDGE APPROVED


rolling_logolock_process-1

gdb_seal1 MINT Logo
SBNYC Official Logo

facebook NEW GEC_NYC_Logo_Color

© 2017   Created by Judy Harper.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service